New Word #40: Bluster, Blaster, Or Blister

There are a score of words that start with “b” and end in “st” or “ster”, which are very confusing. I hope listing them out here will reduce the confusion, but I know I am probably hoping too much. Still we try, despite knowing the futility of it.

Image by Momentmal from Pixabay

blust: This is not a word. It is probably a word in German, according to the omniscient google search, but it is not a word in English.

bluster: talk in a loud, aggressive, or indignant way with little effect. It can be either noun or verb. I often read about this word on google news.

blast: a destructive wave of highly compressed air spreading outward from an explosion.

blaster: a person or thing that emits or uses blasts. This word is more often used in fitness exercise, which means a type of physical exercise intended to strengthen specific muscle groups. My ear can’t distinguish between “blaster” and “bluster”. They just sound the same to me despite all the efforts to convince me otherwise.

blist: this is not a word.

blister: a small bubble on the skin filled with serum and caused by friction, burning, or other damage.

bust: a sculpture of a person’s head, shoulders, and chest; a woman’s chest as measured around her breasts.

buster: used as a mildly disrespectful or humorous form of address, especially to a man or boy.

blockbuster: a thing of great power or size, in particular a movie, book, or other product that is a great commercial success.

busted: (slang) Caught in the act of doing something one shouldn’t do. This word is often used in sitcom or movies, more often than its cousin bust or buster.

bolst: This is not a word, but probably it is a slang, but I’ve never seen it being used.

bolster: support or strengthen; prop up. This word is often used on buildings or pillows–something to support other things.

burst: (of a container) break suddenly and violently apart, spilling the contents, typically as a result of an impact or internal pressure. For example, burst into flames.

burster: a powerful short-lived bursts of radiation; a violent wave.

boast: talk with excessive pride and self-satisfaction about one’s achievements, possessions, or abilities.

boaster: A boaster is someone who is known for boasting and bragging.

bast: fibrous material from the phloem of a plant, used as fiber in matting, cord, etc.

baste: pour juices or melted fat over (meat) during cooking in order to keep it moist. This word is often used during Thanksgiving when a turkey is roasted in the oven.

baster: a person who bastes meat or other food.

bastion: a projecting part of a fortification built at an angle to the line of a wall, so as to allow defensive fire in several directions. It is more often used to describe an institution, place, or person strongly defending or upholding particular principles, attitudes, or activities.

bist: Not a word.

bister: a brownish-yellowish pigment made from the soot of burned wood.

35 thoughts on “New Word #40: Bluster, Blaster, Or Blister

        1. LOL. Thank you so much for the encouragement. My memory is really bad, which is the reason why I list the words out. LOL. Rematching is a great idea and I should try that. LOL.

          Liked by 1 person

  1. Once again, this would be a treasure chest for someone wanting to write a rhyming poem with alliteration. ‘bister’ was the new one for me here and although I was aware of the term ‘baste’ I guess I never knew that someone could be a ‘baster’.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LOL. That’s such a good point, really. “Baster” makes it sound like it is a profession of certain sort. “I am looking for a job.” “OK. We have a ‘baster’ position open. Can you do it?”

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Wow, good to know. That’s so very interesting. Now living in the English environment for so long, I hardly hear any other language from TV. LOL. This is partly the reason I start to learn Thai. Learning a new language keeps my mind alert. LOL.

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      1. Sehr gut! Yes, that’s right! You have my utter respect! German is a difficult language to learn. Why do you learn German? It’s not the most beautiful language. “Hard” sounding instead of the melodious Italian and French! 😊

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Wow, you make me afraid of German language now. LOL. By the way, I gave a reply to your previous comment, but I later changed it. However I am afraid that your notification will still show the first reply, which might not be the most polite version. LOL. Hope everything is fine….

          Liked by 1 person

        2. I’m learning German because I’m already fluent in Dutch and the languages are quite similar. Trust me, Dutch isn’t that pretty either 😊 But I feel a strong connection to the countries around Nederland.

          Liked by 2 people

        3. Oh, nice to know. I’ve always wondered the difference between people from Belgium, Netherlands, and surrounding countries. They must be different and that’s quite interesting.

          Liked by 1 person

        4. Wow, well said. I wonder how similar is Dutch to English? I actually met a guy from Netherlands and his girlfriend briefly in Pennsylvania, but the thing is such interesting topics about language and customs just don’t appear in our casual conversations. Usually it is just meaningless trivial. I have absolutely no memory of anything we said and nothing in my memory. LOL.

          Liked by 1 person

        5. Dutch is actually the closest language in the world to English. Many words are similar to the english version, for instance – ‘communicatie’ is communication, information is ‘informatie’, combination is ‘combinatie, concentration is ‘concentratie’. It’s quite easy to guess what the Dutch version of something will be.

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        6. You mean cartoon dubbed in English? Too bad we don’t get any dubbed movies or TV shows here. All in English. I wish there are some dubbed entertainment.

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  2. Had to actually google “blust”. Never heard that German word. (And it’s my mother tongue.) Which is not surprising. It is a very old word from centuries past and means “blossom”. 😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Wow, blossom. That is amazing. Sometimes I do feel that a blossoming flower is a kind of blasting bluster. LOL. Thank you for letting me know and it is so much fun when we learn together. LOL.

      Liked by 1 person

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