New Word #16: Words Recently Learned

sprightly: lively; full of energy. I learned this word from Pooja here. It also shows up in William Wordsworth’s poem, “Along the margin of a bay:/Ten thousand saw I at a glance,/Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.”

bugbear: a cause of obsessive fear, irritation, or loathing. I learned this word from Pooja here.

calisthenics: gymnastic exercises to achieve bodily fitness and grace of movement. I learned this word from Heterodox Buddhist here.

sitch: a situation or state of affairs, usually a bad situation. I learned this word from Bonnyword Manor here. This word is not to be confused with snitch, which means to secretly tell someone in authority that someone else has done something bad, often in order to cause trouble.

plink: a short, sharp, metallic or ringing sound.
tendril: A slender threadlike appendage of a climbing plant. I learned these two words from Bonnywood Manor here.

chuff: (of a steam engine) move with a regular sharp puffing sound.
chuffed: very pleased (British slang). I learned this from Shammi here. This is not to be confused with chaff and chaffed. Chaff means husk as a noun and tease as a verb.

serendipity: the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way. This is from Herb here.

shill: an accomplice of a hawker, gambler, or swindler who acts as an enthusiastic customer to entice or encourage others. This is from Herb here. I have always wondered how to say this in English and now I know.

stanchion: an upright bar, post, or frame forming a support or barrier. This is from Clayjonz’s cartoon here. We have all seen stanchions and ropes in a hotel lobby to cordon off an area so that people would not enter. I’ve always wondered how to say this.

26 thoughts on “New Word #16: Words Recently Learned

    1. Thank you. πŸ˜œπŸ˜ƒπŸ˜. Let’s learn together even though when I go back now, I find that I can’t remember half of them already. It is said you have to encounter a word at least 5 different times before you can have a vague impression of it, unless you are super good with memory.

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  1. I learnt quite a few words from you today and thanks for linking back to mine. I actually didn’t know any except both of mine and serendipity. Serendipity is one of my favourite words but not one I use often. I just find it very fun to say lol.

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    1. Yes, serendipity is such a pronounceable word. LOL. I too have never used it in my writing–am I not taking enough risk with new words? LOL. Yes, how much we learn from others. πŸ˜œπŸ‘πŸ˜πŸ’–

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    1. LOL. Yes, it is such a wonderful word. In life, we are often preparing ourselves for unexpected bad things happening–the rainy days–and it will be a great welcome surprise when the nice serendipity arrives.

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    1. Thank you. Yes, they are interesting words in my humble opinion. Reading blogs can make one pile up the new words. LOL. I learned several words from your bilingual posts too. πŸ˜œπŸ’–πŸŒΉ

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    1. LOL. Love those words and your picture stories. Actually I had never known picture story can be this fun until I read your posts. Even though many references are distinctively old Hollywood and distinctively pop music, I can grasp certain portion… Are they obscure words? I wonder how obscure they are. LOL. I hope they are interesting words.

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  2. Thanks for the shout-out! Very good job on all of the words, also. On the word stanchion, the ch is sounded like chew. I hope that helps. I first learned the word stanchion on my uncle’s dairy farm. He called the frames the cows put their heads into, stanchions.

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    1. Thank you for the word “shill” since I’ve always wanted to know how people describe such kind of thing in English. LOL. Is he talking about the vertical wood bar in a fence for horses and cows? That is very much stanchion like. LOL.

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